TABLE 1: ADELAIDE TEAMS
TEAM NAME LEAD INSTITUTE SCI-TECH PROPOSITION
Winegrape extracts Australian Wine Research Institute Thousands of tonnes of grape marc (the solid remains of grapes, after pressing for juice) are produced annually as a by-product of winemaking. This material, made of grape skins and seeds, is currently used for recovery of low value products such as ethanol, tartaric acid or fed to stock. Flavour precursors are highly concentrated in grape marc and can be extracted in a simple process, creating an opportunity for generating an extra value stream from this by-product. An opportunity exists for a business or service to process grape marc and sell flavour precursors to a range of customers.
TeamPlantago The University of Adelaide Psyllium is currently made exclusively from Plantago ovata seeds grown in India. We have discovered a native Australian psyllium (NAP) with unique and novel properties providing commercial potential. As a native plant adjusted to the Australian climate it may offer a valuable alternative to farmers. It is better agronomically with higher yields, upright stature and non-shattering seed capsules. It has superior gelling and water holding properties. NAP is potentially a more versatile natural food thickening agent with enhanced gut health applications combined with improved nutritional and sensory properties for use in processed food (particularly gluten free baked products).
OminWell Chip University of South Australia OminWell are developing a novel platform to support the growth of microtissue in the lab in a way that more closely resembles the three-dimensional microenvironment in the body, where simpler to more complex tumour models can be recreated from co-cultures of tumour cells with other cell types to organs. This platform is designed to provide greater predictive power for screening drugs prior to preclinical and clinical studies and will reduce the burden of cancer and facilitate the study of diseases across multiple stages of disease progression under controlled conditions.
Optical pH Sensors for Medical and Industrial Use The University of Adelaide Reliable measurement of pH is critical to a range of applications including industrial processes, where variations can impact the quality or yield of pharmaceuticals, and within medicine where pH is an indicator of poor health outcomes. The Institute for Photonics and Advanced Sensing has developed an improved device for measuring pH in industrial and medical samples, based on an optical fibre probe. Traditional probes are limited in where they can be used, whereas this device has been designed to perform reliable, accurate measurements in these challenging environments, presenting opportunities to add value to existing methods and technologies.
Tests R us University of South Australia Tests R us has developed an easy to use, high throughput capable, chemo response test will enable clinicians to take the guess work out of cancer therapy, providing patients with a true personalised solution and reducing costs to the healthcare system.
Solar autonomous chiller University of South Australia Solar autonomous chiller (SA_Chiller) is an air-conditioner which can handle the space cooling demand of a building using only energy generated from solar energy system. To reliably operate the SA_Chiller with energy from the sun, there is need for large energy storage. The benefit from deploying SA_Chiller is that the energy generated from the PV array buffers is stored both in the battery and inside thermal storage, making the SA_Chiller a cost feasible investment. Our research aim is to techno-economically optimize the SA_Chiller integration to size a system that can reliably satisfy the building occupants comfort conditions while remaining cost efficient. 
HydraSpectra Autonomous Plant Informatics CSIRO Agriculture & Food HydraSpectra Autonomous Plant Informatics is engineering an autonomous vehicle with georeferencing capabilities that could scan whole plants (from the ground to growth tip), producing 3D images of a crop’s nutrient status. It would allow for the capture of essential nutrients translocating from older leaves at the bottom to new leaves at the growth tip. Depth slicing capabilities (sensors capturing spectral data equidistant on the device from ground to growth tip) would capture nutrient supply in real-time. Reduced supply to the growth tip from older leaves low in the canopy would indicate probable deficiencies. This would allow for a proactive approach to addressing nutrient deficiencies earlier, improving plant outcomes.
VariantGrid University of South Australia VariantGrid is developing a simple system like online flight or hotel booking, but for genetic tests. This could make genetic testing easier and more accessible. 
Sustainable Futures CSIRO Services

CSIRO has delivered a leading sustainability education program called Sustainable Futures for over 10 years and is now ready to take its reach and impact to the next level - to equip students nation-wide to solve the biggest, boldest and most complex sustainability challenges of the future. In the next 40 years, Australia will experience unprecedented economic, environmental and social sustainability challenges. To solve them, the future workforce will need stronger foundations in science, technology, engineering and mathematics; skills for innovation; and deep knowledge of sustainability. Sustainable Futures will deliver this solution.

VariantGrid University of South Australia VariantGrid is developing a simple system like online flight or hotel booking, but for genetic tests. This could make genetic testing easier and more accessible.
Sustainable Futures CSIRO Services CSIRO has delivered a leading sustainability education program called Sustainable Futures for over 10 years and is now ready to take its reach and impact to the next level - to equip students nation-wide to solve the biggest, boldest and most complex sustainability challenges of the future. In the next 40 years, Australia will experience unprecedented economic, environmental and social sustainability challenges. To solve them, the future workforce will need stronger foundations in science, technology, engineering and mathematics; skills for innovation; and deep knowledge of sustainability. Sustainable Futures will deliver this solution.
VR technologies for training and education The University of Adelaide The tools developed to use VR for tracking and training can be used in a multitude of scenarios. We have the technology, but don't know what the demand is, nor what the best market for the technology would be. VR technologies for training and education want to develop, evaluate VR scenarios in training spaces. From industry and first responders, the team want to improve training outcomes and ensure it is more reliable. They would like to build in psychological skills to the VR tools to ensure we are adaptive for differing human behaviour.
Miko Yamada University of South Australia Miko Yamada’s idea is to develop a point of care non-melanoma skin cancer diagnostic, allowing for easier and faster identification.

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